‘Brown Bag’ Seminar  "Political Economy of the Sulu Sultanate in the Philippine Islands and Entanglement with the Sea-faring World”

‘Brown Bag’ Seminar "Political Economy of the Sulu Sultanate in the Philippine Islands and Entanglement with the Sea-faring World”

Date & Time

28 March 2012, 00:00

Venue

Environmental Studies Lab, NIE 3-02-27

Department

Humanities & Social Studies Education (HSSE)

Category

Conferences

Events Details

Abstract:

This paper argues that Spanish suzerainty over the Philippines from 1521-1898 was not as exhaustive as believed, as could be seen from the recusant Sulu islands. And because Spain never fully controlled Sulu, Muslim state building proceeded which saw her developing economic and political ties with the wider Muslim world of insular Southeast Asia. The paper further examines how being a coalescence of localized power centres (mandala), characterised by political structures that were weakly centralised, the Sulu ruler was able to assume and maintain power against rivals in the Malay archipelago and colonial Spain through a complex interweaving of links engendered by blood connections, obligation, bridewealth and elite gift exchanges, warfare and slave raiding – links core to Southeast Asian political economies and the very foundations of political power.

 

The speaker:

Dr Chin Chung Ming is currently teaching History in a school. His doctoral research, done during his candidacy at the National University of Singapore, is focused on the impact of an agricultural policy on rice farmers in a rice growing village in Laguna, Philippines. The areas of study he is interested in are on political economy, food security and government policies.