HSSE 'Brown Bag' Seminar Becoming a “Good Nixon Doctrine Country”: Political relations between the United States and Singapore during the Nixon presidency

HSSE 'Brown Bag' Seminar Becoming a “Good Nixon Doctrine Country”: Political relations between the United States and Singapore during the Nixon presidency

Date & Time

27 August 2014, 00:00

Venue

NIE 3-02-27

Department

Humanities & Social Studies Education (HSSE)

Category

Social Science

Events Details

About the Topic

The Nixon Doctrine, which devolved US troops from direct involvement in Asian conflicts but gave priority to military sales and economic assistance, was considered by some commentators to be an inefficacious foreign policy approach that did little to serve US interests in Asia during the Cold War. Using Singapore as a case study, this seminar argues that President Richard Nixon’s foreign policy approach improved US-Singapore relations significantly from 1970 onwards. After a period of flirtation with the Soviet Union during 1968-72, Singapore came to be labelled a “good Nixon Doctrine country” by the US government in 1973. Through the sale of US military equipment and economic assistance, Singapore and the US cultivated bilateral ties that endured after the withdrawal of American troops from Vietnam in 1973 and the fall of Saigon two years later.

About the Speakers

Daniel graduated from the National Institute of Education in 2005 with a BA (Ed) with honours and an MA (Social Studies) in 2010. After five years as a teacher and Head of Department in a Singapore primary school, he enrolled in a PhD program in history at the Australian National University. He recently submitted his doctoral dissertation “Intimacy at a Distance: A history of United States-Singapore foreign relations from 1965 to 1975”, which examines the role of the US in Singapore’s security and economic development during the first ten years of independence. Daniel is currently co-authoring a book on Singapore’s diplomacy with Evelyn Goh.