Is losing track of time a gate to well-being?: Examining psychometric properties of psychological time as an index of engagement

Project Number
RI 10/12 MK

Project Duration
April 2013 - January 2016

Status
Completed

Abstract
Singaporeans need to acquire the right mix of hard and soft skills and be more entrepreneurial by enhancing their creativity and innovation to survive the uncertain global economic situations (Economic Review Committee, 2003). The new global, fast-changing economic world requires knowledgeable workers who can synthesize and evaluate new information, think critically, and solve problems (Fredricks, Blumenfeld, & Paris, 2004). To promote creativity and innovation, we have to start with pupils in school. In fact, the Ministry of Education (2009) clearly stated that an entrepreneurial and enterprising spirit and resilience in the face of adversity are desired outcomes of secondary and pre-university education. Consequently, a question of interest emerges. That is, "How can educators assist students in achieving the desired learning outcomes?" Given that establishing a commitment to education is necessary so that students can obtain the capabilities they will need to succeed in the current marketplace (Fredricks et al., 2004), one of keys to achieve the desired learning outcomes would be to promote students' engagement in learning. The concept of engagement has attracted increasing attention in recent years as a leitmotif in research attempting to identify the factors that enhance academic achievement and resilience, and protect adolescents from drop-out and delinquency (Fredricks et al., 2004; Skinner, Kindermann, Connell, & Wellborn, 2009). Despite the increasing interest in the concept of engagement, consensus about its conceptual and operational definitions have not been achieved yet due to a number of interrelated conceptual and methodological issues (Applenton, Christenson, & Furlong, 2008; Fredricks et al., 2004; Jimerson, Campos, & Greif, 2003; Skinner, Kindermann, & Furrer, 2009). Given that engagement is a potentially important and useful construct, it is critical to address the conceptual and/or methodological issues. In the present project, therefore, we aim to develop a psychometrically sound method to measure the construct of engagement. This project will make a significant impact internationally because it addresses a fundamental psychological issue that is highly related to the enhancement of human capital and well-being. Engagement would be a key concept to achieve the desired educational outcomes identified by the Ministry of Education (2009) and the Ministry of Trade and Industry(Economic Review Committee, 2003). Thus, this project will contribute to satisfy their needs indirectly by introducing a valid and reliable method to measure people's engagement level. We expect that research outputs from the current project will enhance NIE's international recognition and have an impact on the educational fraternity internationally. we aim to develop a psychometrically sound method to measure the construct of engagement. This project will make a significant impact internationally because it addresses a fundamental psychological issue that is highly related to the enhancement of human capital and well-being. Engagement would be a key concept to achieve the desired educational outcomes identified by the Ministry of Education (2009) and the Ministry of Trade and Industry (Economic Review Committee, 2003). Thus, this project will contribute to satisfy their needs indirectly by introducing a valid and reliable method to measure people's engagement level. We expect that research outputs from the current project will enhance NIE's international recognition and have an impact on the educational fraternity internationally.

Funding Source
NIE

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