Development of low cost “green” paper based electrochemical biosensors

Project Number
RI 7/12 TSN

Project Duration
May 2013 - April 2017

Status
In-Progress (Extended)

Abstract
My research activities have focused on the development of electrochemical biosensors for various applications, e.g. clinical and environmental areas. Recently, we could integrate a cellulose filter paper with screen printed electrode (SPE) to make a sensor for detection of heavy metals [1]. In addition, in collaboration with Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering-NTU, SIMTech and DSO my research group has been involved in developing an electrochemical enzymatic biosensor for detection of nerve agent in blood using a conventional microfluidic lab-on-a chip device. Integration of electrochemical detection methods with microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices provides a very strong platform for miniaturization of analytical methods. The reasons being that electrochemical instrumentation requires very low power consumption and only a small amount of reagent is required for analysis. Thus, electrochemical instrumentation can be miniaturized and integrated on a portable hand-held device. This would be useful for field based or point of care applications. Using this academic research fund, we are going to fabricate electrochemical paper-based biosensors for the detection of anlaytes with clinical and environmental significance, e.g. glucose, hydrogen peroxide and phenolics compounds. The performance of the biosensors will be tested using commercial screen printed electrodes (SPEs) initially and ultimately the carbon based electrodes will be integrated on the filter paper using microfluidic direct patterning technique. Specific filter paper will be chemically treated to accommodate the capillary channels for conducting samples through capillary wicking. All required chemical reagents, working, reference and counter electrode, electrical pads can be implemented on desired functionalized papers using ink jet printing and wax printing methods to make paper-based electrochemical sensing strips. Consequently a simple and "green" lab-on-paper device will be developed. The key advantage of this approach is that developing paper based detection system will be very inexpensive, portable, printable and biodegradable or totally disposable by incineration. Using the mentioned fabrication technology, we are going to make single-use and disposable paper-based biosensor analytical strips. After successful completion of this project, these paper based disposable analytical strips can be integrated with a portable potentiostat system, as a reader, for conducting on-site tests. In addition, an array of paper-based electrodes can be implemented in an enclosed microfluidic channel for multiple reagents or pollutants detection for potential future applications. 1.Tan, S.N., et al Paper Disk on Screen Printed Electrode for One-Step Sensing with an Internal Standard. Analytical Chemistry, 2010. 82(21): p. 8844-8847. y advantage of this approach is that developing paper based detection system will be very inexpensive, portable, printable and biodegradable or totally disposable by incineration. Using the mentioned fabrication technology, we are going to make single-use and disposable paper-based biosensor analytical strips. After successful completion of this project, these paper based disposable analytical strips can be integrated with a portable potentiostat system, as a reader, for conducting on-site tests. In addition, an array of paper-based electrodes can be implemented in an enclosed microfluidic channel for multiple reagents or pollutants detection for potential future applications. 1.Tan, S.N., et al Paper Disk on Screen Printed Electrode for One-Step Sensing with an Internal Standard. Analytical Chemistry, 2010. 82(21): p. 8844-8847.

Funding Source
NIE

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