Bachelor of Arts (History)

Category/ Subject Course Code Title No of AUs
ACADEMIC SUBJECT 
Year 1 AAH10A The Historian and His Craft 3
AAH10C Singapore History: The Making of a Global City- State 3
Year 2 AAH20D Historical Interpretations 3
AAH23J History and Film 3
AAH23K Dawn of Asian Civilisations 3
Year 3 AAH33D Maritime China 3
AAH33J The Nineteenth-Century World of Southeast Asia 3
AAH33M Peace and War in Twentieth-century Asia 3
Year 4 AAH43A Tradition and Resistance in Twentieth-Century Southeast Asia 3
AAH43G The Vietnam War 3
CURRICULUM STUDIES  
Year 2 ACH22A Introduction to the Teaching and Learning of Secondary History: Principles of Lesson Planning and Pedagogical Approaches 3
Year 4 ACH42A Inquiry-based Experiential Learning: Fieldtrip Design for Secondary History 3
GENERAL ELECTIVE 
  AAH18A Contemporary Singapore 3

 

Please refer to the BA website for more information.

 


 

Course Synopses

 

AAH10A The Historian and His Craft

This course will introduce student teachers to the seemingly bland question of what is a historian and what he or she does. The role of a historian in society is more than being the recorder or storyteller of myriad narratives but essentially one of ‘power’. The historian, by virtue of the subject, is not divorced from the complex realities of the present. A challenging role intertwining the personal with the professional, the communal with the national, the historian should ‘know no country’ and deconstructs history as a lawyer would balance conflicting accounts but the processes of ‘doing’ history are more challenging and at times disconcerting than these ideals. This course will analyse critically these processes of ‘doing’ history complementing it with an introduction and application of the critical skills necessary in nurturing and refining a historian’s craft.

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AAH10C Singapore History: The Making of a Global City- State

This course looks at critical stages in the birth, decline and rise again of Singapore as a Global City. Singapore first briefly bloomed in the thirteenth to fourteenth centuries, declined into relative obscurity as a minor Malay port, and then from 1819 entered a new, free-trade and multicultural phase of development. This course takes the story from the early years, through the nineteenth century, to the tumultuous birth of a new nation after the war. It covers the major markers of Singapore history, and the variety of that history, with its experience of development and disaster, conflict and peace, multiculturalism and modernity, and wealth and poverty. It is a History that allows for the perspectives of a variety of people who helped to build Singapore, from the politician and the colonialist, to the prostitute and the opium addict. This course is suitable for NTU students who want a good overview of key points in the historical formation and shaping of Singapore up to 1965, as a multicultural city-state, located in the Malay maritime world, but also becoming first an Imperial and then a Global City.

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AAH20D Historical Interpretations

Can history be objective? Who owns history? History is what we make of it or what we want it to be? Historical interpretations essentially beg many other such infuriating questions from the definition, components and ‘selection’ bias of the discipline. The course will be asking myriad questions of the theoretical and the practical but crucially will attempt to explore the subject of history from how it affects the individual, society and nation in the past and into the future. Through selective case studies such as the Holocaust, the ‘discovery’ of the New World and post World War Two accounts, student teachers will consider the many ways in which historians go about creating history.

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AAH23J History and Film

History does not only include examining the written word. Other mediums, such as film, can be used in looking at the past. This course covers the use of film as a source for exploring the past, and how history has been represented in film. The history of cinema and television is also studied. The emphasis is on empowering student teachers to interpret films in critical and analytical ways, as well as teaching student teachers how films are created. The skills of historical interpretation and writing history are taught. This course is offered to all NTU students.

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AAH23K Dawn of Asian Civilisations

This course provides an introductory survey of the beginning and the growth of civilisations across Asia from the prehistoric times to 1400 AD. The course begins with a brief study of the early phase of human society before studying the rise of first states and their socio-economic underpinnings. Using innovative technological means and drawing examples from India, Southeast Asia and China in the light of archaeological evidence and other historical records, this course will discuss major cultural developments such as the rise and the expansion of religions and the ways in which they influenced the life of people, and how their material life changed over time. This course is open to all students in NTU who are interested in learning about the early phase of Asian civilisation.

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AAH33D Maritime China

Maritime China has long been viewed as peripheral to the history of Imperial China, traditionally perceived as a land power. The maritime frontier was further seen as passive and inert, evoking no special attention from the centre. This course addresses these misconceptions by examining the maritime tradition and history of China over the centuries from national and international perspectives, through an overview of crucial themes such as continuities and change in political, institutional, religious, cultural and social processes on the maritime frontier. It surveys the maritime history of China beginning in the twelfth century, with more in-depth coverage for the period 1500 to the present, where contemporary regional tensions over geo-political considerations find reference and origins in China’s considerations and views of its maritime frontier.

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AAH33J The Nineteenth-Century World of Southeast Asia

The course is an exploration into several themes of interest, such as empire building, diaspora as well as the subaltern and “middling” world, in nineteenth century Southeast Asia. Specific primary sources such as memoirs, travelogues and contemporary histories written during the period will serve as stimuli, hand-in-hand with secondary interpretations to bring student teachers back into the world of the past in this region. For instance, a fieldtrip walk will be undertaken, based on an 1860 map of Singapore, to relive the environs of one of the most bustling settlements in the region. At the end, it is hoped that student teachers will gain a deeper appreciation of Southeast Asian history.

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AAH33M Peace and War in Twentieth-century Asia

This course focuses on the history of relations between Asian countries, and the broad ideological, economic, and cultural forces that have influenced the evolution of international politics in the twentieth century. Topics covered by this course will include the rise of newly independent states in Asia, the cause and consequences of the three major global conflicts in Asia: the First World War, the Second World War and the Cold War, the major regional conflicts: the Korean war, the Vietnam war, and the armed conflicts between China and the Soviet Union. This course is also offered to students of NTU with an interest in world history, particularly in international politics of modern Asia.

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AAH43A Tradition and Resistance in Twentieth-Century Southeast Asia

With the final decades of the nineteenth century as background, selected events and developments of the twentieth century are traced up to the early postWorld War II period. “Tradition” can refer to beliefs and behaviours that have symbolic meanings and are in use or barely in use. Viewed from a different perspective, it can also refer to groups and practices which are “dominant” in society rather than “archaic” and “peripheral”. The term “resistance” therefore juxtaposes as an expected reaction along a scale of responses that entities in societies can conjure against “tradition”. This course will examine an array of case studies from the cultural, political, military and economic contexts of Southeast Asia to re-assess the terms in studies in the humanities and in particular, in the subject of history.

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AAH43G The Vietnam War

This course focuses on the Vietnam War. It is a state-of-the-field survey/study of the conflict from its beginning (soon after World War II) to its end in 1975. At the chronological level, the course will trace the development of the war from both the communist and non-communist perspectives and the decisionmakings (both military and diplomatic) of the United States (Washington and beyond), North and South Vietnam (that is Hanoi and Saigon), Beijing and Moscow. Attention will also be paid to the perspective of Southeast Asia. At the thematic level, the course will also look at other aspects such as the literature, films and music of the Vietnam War in order to capture the human dimension of the war on both sides of the conflict. There will be opportunities for student teachers to pursue in greater depth topics related to the Vietnam War which may be of particular interest. This course is also offered to students of NTU with an interest in the Vietnam War.

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ACH22A Introduction to the Teaching and Learning of Secondary History: Principles of Lesson Planning and Pedagogical Approaches

This course introduces student teachers to the teaching and learning of History in secondary schools. The course will give student teachers an insight into the nature and purpose of History education in the curriculum, and provide them with opportunities to examine emerging issues and key questions that are central to the teaching of the discipline. This course also aims to equip student teachers with the pedagogical knowledge and instructional strategies that may support and enhance the teaching and learning of History at both the lower and upper secondary levels. Student teachers will be taught basic principles of effective lesson planning, and will be given ample practice in developing lesson plans that are inquiry-based and designed to support active learning in the classroom.

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ACH42A Inquiry-based Experiential Learning: Fieldtrip Design for Secondary History

The course seeks to expose student teachers to an interesting and challenging strategy in the teaching of History by taking them out of the classroom. It focuses on how fieldtrips can be used as valuable extensions to classroom instruction to develop student teachers’ understanding about the past and increase their knowledge of topics through active hands-on experience with the rich resources within the community. By positioning fieldwork as an essential means of inquiring about the past, the course aims to equip student teachers with the basic means to design inquiry-based fieldtrips that connect student teachers’ experiences with stated educational objectives. Using Group Investigation as a guiding framework, student teachers are required to conceptualise, plan, organise and conduct inquirybased fieldtrips to selected sites in Singapore. In the course of planning for these fieldtrips, student teachers will not only discover little-known facts or information about the sites visited, but will themselves develop deeper awareness of their own culture and heritage.

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AAH18A Contemporary Singapore

Provides student teachers unfamiliar with the history of Singapore with an overview of how our past is linked with our present. Topics covered include the founding of Singapore, growth of our port, origins of our plural society, the Japanese occupation, the conflicts of the tumultuous 1950s, merger and separation, and political and economic transformation after 1965.

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