WHITEHEAD Richard Angus

Designation
Lecturer

Department
English Language & Literature (ELL)

Office Location
NIE3-03-107

Education
PhD University of York, UK

Email
richard.whitehead@nie.edu.sg

Office Telephone Number
67903453

Research Interests
18th and 19th century British Georgic poetry, Anglophone Singaporean literature, historicizing William and Catherine Blake, migrant writings in Singapore, wit in popular American and British song lyrics (1920-2018)

  • My research interests include archival recovery of the immediate social and historical contexts within which William and Catherine Blake lived and worked, early nineteenth century labouring class poetry, lyrics in current dissenting rock music (especially Bob Dylan, Alice Cooper, Peaches Nisker, Julian Cope & Mark E Smith) and roads less/ hitherto never travelled in Singapore literary studies (notably poet Wong May local migrant worker writings).

    I recently co-edited with Professor Angelia Poon a collection of essays on Anglophone Singapore literature (Singapore Literature and Culture; Current Directions in Local and Global Contexts (Routledge, 2017). I have recently completed essays on Peaches Nisker ("stick it to the pimp": Peaches' Penetration of American Popular Culture', Tristanne Connolly and Tomyki Iino, eds Canadian Music and American Culture; Get Away From Me (Palgrave, 2017)) and William Blake’s letters (The Uncollected Letters of William Blake, Huntington Library Quarterly, 2017).

    I am currently researching the comic in the works of Kelantan writer Che Husna Azhari, sexualities in contemporary millennial Singapore poetry and homosocial metaphor, wit and allusion in the song lyrics and other writings of Bob Dylan, Alice Cooper, Julian Cope and Mark E Smith.

    I am supervising doctoral research into Shakespeare and his engagements with contemporary architecture.

  • Pedagogical research interests include learning journeys/ student field trips in the local Singaporean context, the ICT and supernatural possibilities proffered by the William Blake Archive, imaginative strategies for teaching students unseen poetry and prose, developing a realistic and challenging canon of local literature for study in Singapore secondary schools, and strategies for ensuring the survival and growth of Literature in English as a GCE subject in the Singaporean neighbourhood school.

    Currently, I am supervising research on the development of a more inclusively gynocentric pedagogical approach to literature in Singapore Schools, as well as nuanced strategies for exploring race in local literature within the secondary school context.